Milpitas, California | Drinking Water Utility Company

The district drinking water of City of Milpitas may be degraded by numerous impurities including but not limited to Dichloroacetic acid, Strontium and N-Nitrosodi-N-propylamine, while suffering abnormally high counts of water hardness. City of Milpitas serves this county with drinking water which originates its water from Purchased surface water.

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City of Milpitas Details

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Area served:

Milpitas, California

drinking water plant

Population served:

70857

clean water company

Water source:

Purchased surface water

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Phone:

408-586-3000

drinking water storage

Address:

455 E Calaveras Blvd, Milpitas, CA 95035

California Dinking Water Utility

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Contaminants Detected In Milpitas, California

Bromodichloromethane; Bromoform; Chloroform; Chromium (hexavalent); Dibromochloromethane; Dichloroacetic acid; Total trihalomethanes (TTHMs); Trichlor… more

Milpitas Dinking Water Utility

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City of Milpitas

Annual Drinking Water Report

List of Drinking Water Contaminants Tested by City of Milpitas

But Not Detected:
1,1,1,2-Tetrachloroethane; 1,1,1-Trichloroethane; 1,1,2,2-Tetrachloroethane; 1,1,2-Trichloroethane; 1,1-Dichloroethane; 1,1-Dichloroethylene; 1,1-Dichloropropene; 1,2,3-Trichlorobenzene; 1,2,3-Trichloropropane; 1,2,4-Trichlorobenzene; 1,2,4-Trimethylbenzene; 1,2-Dibromo-3-chloropropane (DBCP); 1,2-Dichloroethane; 1,2-Dichloropropane; 1,3,5-Trimethylbenzene; 1,3-Butadiene; 1,3-Dichloropropane; 1,3-Dichloropropene; 1,4-Dioxane; 2,2-Dichloropropane; 2,3,7,8-TCDD (Dioxin); 2,4,5-TP (Silvex); 2,4-D; 2,4-Dinitrotoluene; 3-Hydroxycarbofuran; Alachlor (Lasso); Aldicarb; Aldicarb sulfone; Aldicarb sulfoxide; Aldrin; Aluminum; Antimony; Arsenic; Atrazine; Baygon (Propoxur); Bentazon (Basagran); Benzene; Benzo[a]pyrene; Beryllium; Bromacil; Bromobenzene; Bromochloromethane; Bromomethane; Butachlor; Cadmium; Caffeine; Carbaryl; Carbofuran; Carbon tetrachloride; Chlordane; Chlorodifluoromethane; Chloroethane; Chloromethane; cis-1,2-Dichloroethylene; cis-1,3-Dichloropropene; Cobalt; Cyanide; Dalapon; DCPA mono- and di-acid degradates; Di(2-ethylhexyl) adipate; Di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate; Diazinon (Spectracide); Dibromomethane; Dicamba; Dichlorodifluoromethane; Dichloromethane (methylene chloride); Dieldrin; Dimethoate; Dinoseb; Diquat; Endothall; Endrin; Ethyl tert-butyl ether; Ethylbenzene; Ethylene dibromide; Glyphosate; Heptachlor; Heptachlor epoxide; Hexachlorobenzene (HCB); Hexachlorobutadiene; Hexachlorocyclopentadiene; Isopropyl ether; Isopropylbenzene; Lindane; m- & p-Xylene; m-Dichlorobenzene; Mercury (inorganic); Methiocarb; Methomyl; Methoxychlor; Methyl ethyl ketone; Methyl isobutyl ketone; Metolachlor; Metribuzin; Molinate; Monobromoacetic acid; Monochlorobenzene (chlorobenzene); MTBE; n-Butylbenzene; n-Propylbenzene; Naphthalene; Nitrite; o-Chlorotoluene; o-Dichlorobenzene; o-Xylene; Oxamyl (Vydate); p-Chlorotoluene; p-Dichlorobenzene; p-Isopropyltoluene; Pentachlorophenol; Perchlorate; Perfluorobutane sulfonate (PFBS); Perfluoroheptanoic acid (PFHPA); Perfluorohexane sulfonate (PFHXS); Perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA); Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS); Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA); Picloram; Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs); Propachlor; sec-Butylbenzene; Selenium; Silver; Simazine; Styrene; tert-Amyl methyl ether; tert-Butylbenzene; Tetrachloroethylene (perchloroethylene); Thallium; Thiobencarb; Toluene; Toxaphene; trans-1,2-Dichloroethylene; trans-1,3-Dichloropropene; Trichloroethylene; Trichlorofluoromethane; Trichlorotrifluoroethane; Vinyl chloride; Xylenes (total)

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City of Milpitas

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Email

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The town of Milpitas pulls water from two sources to provide tidy water to occupants and businesses. Water is purchased coming from two separate bulk suppliers: treated surface drinking water from the San Francisco General public Utility Commission (SFPUC) and treated surface area water from the Santa claus Clara Valley Drinking water District (SCVWD). In case water supply is disrupted from either SCVWD or SFPUC, the town has the option of making use of its emergency source to meet basic drinking water needs for a transientness of time. In 2017, the City supplied typically 6. 8 mil gallons of drinking water per day to around 16, 000 homes and businesses intended for indoor and external use. SFPUC Supply SFPUC water is a mixture of Hetch Hetchy drinking water and treated regional water. Most of SFPUC’s water is found from the Hetch Hetchy watershed located in the Sierra Nevada Mountain range This water is usually exempt from filtration requirements by the United States Epa (USEPA) and Condition Water Resources Control Boards’ Division of Water (DDW), due to the guarded Sierra spring snow meltwater resource. Local water is usually collected within the Chopera watershed at Calaveras Reservoir and San Antonio Reservoir. Regional water is cured through filtration and disinfection at the Sunol Valley Water Treatment Plant. SCVWD Source SCVWD water is usually sourced primarily from your Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta watershed via the Southern Bay Aqueduct, Dyer Reservoir, Lake De Valle, and San Luis Reservoir. Water supply is supplemented by local drinking water sources at Anderson and Calero Reservoirs. SCVWD water is usually treated through purification and disinfection in Penitencia and Santa claus Teresa Water Treatment Plants. Emergency Offers the City does not mix or combine SFPUC and SCVWD water under normal working conditions. However, the service areas could be interconnected to provide crisis water supply if required. The City’s drinking water system is also connected with the Alameda Region Water District towards the north and San Jose Water Organization to the south. In the event that there is certainly an emergency, either or perhaps both agencies can offer water to the City. SFPUC and SCVWD discuss an intertie that may supply water in one wholesaler to the additional. The City can also provide short-term emergency water supply applying Pinewood Well, situated in the southwestern part of the City. Drinking-Water Resource Assessment Program Water Source Assessment Applications evaluate the vulnerability of water sources to potential contamination. The two SFPUC and SCVWD have conducted water source assessments intended for the City’s admissible water supplies. The assessments are available to evaluation at the State Drinking water Resources Control Table (SWRCB) - Label of Drinking Water District Workplace. You may request that the summary of the tests be sent to you by calling (510) 620-3474. SFPUC performs an annual watershed hygienic survey for the Hetch Hetchy resource as well as five 12 months sanitary surveys intended for local water resources. These surveys assess the sanitary condition, drinking water quality, potential contaminant sources, and the outcomes of watershed administration activities. The studies were completed with assist from partner companies including the National Recreation area Service and ALL OF US Forest Service. These types of surveys have recognized wildlife, stock, and human activities because of potential contamination resources. SCVWD’s water resources are vulnerable to potential contamination from several land-use methods, such as agricultural and urban runoff, activities, livestock grazing, and residential and commercial development. The brought in sources are also susceptible to wastewater treatment herb discharges, seawater invasion, and wildfire in open space areas. Besides, regional sources are also susceptible to potential contamination coming from commercial stables and historic mining methods. No contaminants connected with any of these activities have already been detected in SCVWD’s treated water. Water treatment plants offer multiple barriers intended for physical removal and disinfection of pollutants. To ensure that tap water is secure to drink, the Circumstance. S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) and the State Drinking water Resources Control Table (State Board) recommend regulations that limit the number of certain pollutants in water given by public water devices. The State Board rules also establish limitations for contaminants found in bottled water that provide a similar protection for public well-being. The sources of water (both tap water and bottled water) consist of rivers, lakes, channels, ponds, reservoirs, suspension springs and wells. Because the water travels within the surface of the property or through the floor, it dissolves naturally occurring minerals and, in some instances, radioactive material, and may pick up substances caused by the presence of animals or perhaps from human activity. Pollutants that may be present in resource water include • Microbial contaminants including viruses and bacterias that may come from sewerage treatment plants, solid waste systems, agricultural animal operations and animals. • Inorganic Pollutants such as salts and metals, that can be naturally-occurring or result from city stormwater runoff, commercial or domestic sewage discharges, oil and gas creation, mining or harvesting. • Pesticides and Weed killers may come from some sources such as farming, urban stormwater runoff and residential uses. • Organic Chemical substance Contaminants including artificial and volatile organic and natural chemicals that are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and may also come from gasoline stations, urban stormwater runoff, agricultural application and septic systems. • Radioactive Contaminants which can be naturally-occurring or become the result of oil and gas creation and mining activities City of Milpitas pulls water from two sources to provide clean water to occupants and businesses. Water is purchased coming from two separate bulk suppliers: treated surface drinking water from the San Francisco General public Utility Commission (SFPUC) and treated surface area water from the Santa Claus Clara Valley Drinking water District (SCVWD). In case the water supply is disrupted from either SCVWD or SFPUC, the town has the option of making use of its emergency source to meet basic drinking water needs for a transientness of time. In 2017, the City supplied typically 6. 8 mil gallons of drinking water per day to around 16, 000 homes and businesses intended for indoor and external use. SFPUC Supply SFPUC water is a mixture of Hetch Hetchy drinking water and treated community water. Most of SFPUC’s water is found from the Hetch Hetchy watershed located in the Sierra Nevada Mountain range This water is usually exempt from filtration requirements by the United States Epa (USEPA) and Condition Water Resources Control Boards’ Division of Water (DDW), due to the guarded Sierra spring snow meltwater resource. Local water is usually collected within the Chopra watershed at Calaveras Reservoir and San Antonio Reservoir. Community water is cured through filtration and disinfection at the Sunol Valley Water Treatment Plant. SCVWD Source SCVWD water is usually sourced primarily from your Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta watershed via the Southern Bay Aqueduct, Dyer Reservoir, Lake De Valle, and San Luis Reservoir. Water supply is supplemented by local drinking water sources at Anderson and Calero Reservoirs. SCVWD water is usually treated through purification and disinfection in Penitencia and Santa Claus Teresa Water Treatment Plants. Emergency Offers the City does not mix or combine SFPUC and SCVWD oceans under normal working conditions. However, the service areas could be interconnected to provide crisis water supply if required. The City’s drinking water system is also connected with the Alameda Region Water District towards the north and San Jose Water Organization to the south. If there is certainly an emergency, either or perhaps both agencies can offer water to the City. SFPUC and SCVWD discuss an intertie that may supply water in one wholesaler to the additional. The City can also provide short term emergency water supply applying Pinewood Well, situated in the southwestern part of the City. Drinking-Water Resource Assessment Program Water Source Asse.

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City of Milpitas Drinking Water Company and EPA

City of Milpitas Drinking Water Report Info
Our Mission: The Public Works Department is committed to enhancing the pleasant of existence and making sure public health and protection in the network. The Public Works Department operates and continues the City's infrastructure and centers including public streets, utilities, parks, road landscaping, City motors, and City homes. The 8 divisions are Administration, Streets Maintenance, Utility Engineering, Utility Operations and Maintenance, Trees and Street Landscaping, Parks Maintenance, Fleet Maintenance, and Facilities Maintenance..

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City of Milpitas Drinking Water Company and CDC

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City of Milpitas provides drinking water services to the public of Milpitas and Milpitas, California.

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